Boycotts

An Orwell, The Middle East And Boycotts Round Up

There is never enough time to read, reflect and blog, so whilst I think over other posts here is a quick round up of stories that caught my eye.

I was surprised to find that George Orwell had a piece on antisemitism. In many respects, it is as if it were written yesterday:

“I could fill pages with similar remarks, but these will do to go on with. Two facts emerge from them. One — which is very important and which I must return to in a moment — is that above a certain intellectual level people are ashamed of being anti-Semitic and are careful to draw a distinction between “anti-Semitism” and “disliking Jews”. The other is that anti-Semitism is an irrational thing. The Jews are accused of specific offences (for instance, bad behaviour in food queues) which the person speaking feels strongly about, but it is obvious that these accusations merely rationalise some deep-rooted prejudice. To attempt to counter them with facts and statistics is useless, and may sometimes be worse than useless. As the last of the above-quoted remarks shows, people can remain anti-Semitic, or at least anti-Jewish, while being fully aware that their outlook is indefensible. If you dislike somebody, you dislike him and there is an end of it: your feelings are not made any better by a recital of his virtues. “

At Liberal Conspiracy, Sunny Hundel is direct in his criticism, Publicity-hungry extremists to protest at US Embassy London.
(more…)

Not A Word About Tibetans, Only Israelis

Some Israelis want to perform a Hebrew version of the Merchant of Venice in Britain.

Not unsurprisingly some members of the English intelligentsia are annoyed.

Some thespians would like to attack the Israeli government, but can’t, so they settle for attacking Israeli actors.

Apparently, the National Theater of Israel is guilty of some crimes in the eyes of these members of the English intelligentsia.

Even the actors’ trade paper, The Stage, puts a negative spin on the matter.

Astute readers will notice, however, an almost deafening silence when it comes to the National Theatre of China.

There’s no talk by English ‘lovies’ of China’s colonisation of Tibet, the invasion some 60 years ago nor of the murderous treatment of Tibetan civilians.

None of that resonates with said hespians, but should some Israelis want to perform a play in Hebrew then all hell breaks loose.

Engage describes the issues.

The Stage’s welcoming article on the collaboration of Scotland and China’s National Theatres in 2010.

I do hope that those genuinely concerned with human rights will inform themselves on China’s rule in Tibet and avoid posturing.